contemporary mosaics

Contemporary mosaics: mosaic innovators.

Mosaic innovators

mosaic innovatorsCaCO3. Movimento n.1. Photo: @Arte Mosaico Ravenna.

 

Part III of a three-part post on contemporary mosaics.

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Part I Highlighted the particular properties of mosaic by demonstrating what mosaics are not.

Part II Examined how contemporary ceramics have broken down the barriers between art and craft and how the material used is less important than the ideas behind it – an obvious lesson for mosaic artists.

This post will look at how contemporary mosaicists are creating work ‘which uses the medium of mosaic, but not to make us think ‘that is a mosaic’ but to make us curious, to amaze us, to unsettle us, to take us, in short, by the scruff of the neck and say: ‘Look, look and look again. I have something interesting and exciting to say.’

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mosaic innovators
Dugald MacInnes, Xenolith (MOHO). Photo: @Chicago Mosaic School

The time has come to look at the world of contemporary mosaics, at the mosaic innovators of our time: the explorers, the risk takers, the convention-shatterers, the beauty-creators. They’re there, they’ve always been there, hiding in plain sight, being exhibited, winning awards, attracting acclaim and attention – but only in certain circles. Continue reading

Contemporary mosaics – learning lessons from ceramics

Part II of a three-part post on mosaics and contemporary art.

‘Ceramics have moved away from utilitarian pottery into a much wider realm… It’s not about craft but about making a new kind of object,’ Medeleine Bessborough, art dealer.

contemporary mosaics
Hattori Makiko, Waiting to Hatch. Photo: @Joanna Bird

Learning lessons: Contemporary mosaics and the world of ceramics.

Part One of this post on contemporary mosaics pointed out the seemingly obvious –  mosaics might create images, patterns and moods but they are not paintings. Mosaics are born of function, rooted in history, and pixelated by necessity and when thinking about the place of contemporary mosaics in the art world they must be understood and responded to on their own terms. The fact that mosaics are made up of collections of things or bits – precious or rubbishy, purpose made or found, artificial or natural – is a fact that defines them. You can’t ask a mosaic to be other than what it is.

I dont care what my label is – potter, ceramicist or artist – I want to put another layer onto history.’ Chris Antemann, artist.
contemporary mosaics
Sandy Brown, Temple at Chatsworth.  Photo: @www.joannabird.com

In times not so very long past, that meant (bizarrely) that mosaics were relegated to a lesser category of creative endeavour. The slipperly. wriggly, elusive thing that calls itself Art might have become ever more elastic in recent decades but somehow mosaics (or at least mosaics which called themselves mosaics) never quite made it. Continue reading